Best read of the week

 

ECRI Names Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns

HealthLeaders Media: Electronic medical records systems can provide clinicians with reams of patient information, but the management of EHR data leads the list of concerns raised by healthcare provider organizations.

 

Additional news media reports on MLH physicians and the health care industry, excerpted from MLH’s daily Morning News Report:

 

Main Line Health News…

HDI 2017 to Feature Technical Support Industry Titans in Program Committee Leading Eight New Learning Tracks

IBTimes: Aran McFarland, Manager, Second-Level IT Support, Main Line Health, is Track Chair for “Putting Metrics to Work: Learn how to effectively utilize metrics and report the most meaningful KPI’s.”

 

Supporting parents when newborns die: ‘Bereavement care is really evolving’

Philadelphia Inquirer: “Our staff do a wonderful job of preparing the parents for what the baby looks like. This way, the families aren’t shocked,” said nurse Susan McAndrews, the perinatal bereavement facilitator at Main Line Health’s four hospitals. “Preparing and offering support is so important.”

 

Donor Dash: Help patients get the organs they need to live on time

Fox 29: One family’s Donor Dash team – Charles’s Legacy — has grown to 200 participants. “Charles went to Paoli Hospital and they were absolutely incredible for three days. They did everything in their power to save his life, but [eventually] they took us into a room and asked if we would be willing to do the [organ donation].”

 

 

Regional Health Care News…

Donating blood or organs could get you a tax break in New Jersey

Philadelphia Business Journal: The proposed $1,000 tax credit would encourage more people to donate bone marrow, part of a liver, or all or part of a lung or kidney.

 

The 10 Philly docs who got more than $400K in medical-industry payouts

Philadelphia Inquirer: Nine of them invented or helped to develop a new joint replacement, and one, Thomas Jefferson University’s Demetrius Bagley, developed endoscopes for use in urology. Eight of them are from Rothman Institute.

 

 

Patient Care News…

Pressed Into Caregiving Sooner Than Expected

The New York Times:  Most family members caring for elders are over 55, the National Academy of Sciences reported last year, and the older people most likely to need “intensive support” from family are in their 80s or older.

 

Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths From Heart Disease, Diabetes

HealthDay: Using available studies and clinical trials, researchers identified 10 dietary factors with the strongest evidence of a protective or harmful association with death due to “cardiometabolic” disease.

 

U.S. approves new drug to treat advanced breast cancer

WHYY:  The drug, called Kisqali, is a pill that works to slow the spread of cancer by blocking two proteins that can stimulate growth and division of cancer cells. It’s for women who have metastatic breast cancer known as HR+/HER2-.

 

We’re losing our hearing — and it’s only going to get worse

Miami Herald : Researchers from Johns Hopkins Medicine in Baltimore predict that 44 million — or 15 percent of U.S. adults — will have some hearing loss by 2020. That will increase to 23 percent of all adults 20 and older by 2060.

 

Telemedicine OK for ICU Coma Assessment, Researchers Say

HealthLeaders Media: The study was conducted over a 15-month period and included 100 patients who were randomly assigned two Mayo Clinic physicians, one who conducted their assessments at the bedside and another who assessed patients via a desktop workstation on another floor in the same hospital.

 

Kangaroo Care’ For Premature Babies Has Long-Lasting Effects, Study Shows

CBS3: A study in the Journal Pediatrics shows babies who had Kangaroo Care are thriving 20 years later. “Having better jobs, having higher-functioning in society and making more money, and having more normal behaviors,” said Dr. Sean Bailey, NYU Langone Medical Center.

 

Study: Letting patients set visit agendas in EHRs improves physician-patient encounter

Healthcare DIVE: Enabling patients to type their visit agendas into the electronic health record systems (EHRs) before an appointment may improve care by engaging patients and helping physicians prioritize patients’ concerns, a study in the latest issue of Annals of Family Medicine concludes.

 

 

Quality and Safety News…

Patient Safety Efforts Need Engaged Leaders

HealthLeaders Media: The Joint Commission warns that hospital leaders are not promoting changes needed to improve attitudes toward safety, and new research both confirms and challenges the validity of tools designed to measure patient safety culture.

 

Should hospitals — and doctors — apologize for medical mistakes?

Washington Post: Spurred by concerns about the “deny and defend” model — including its cost, lack of transparency and the perpetuation of errors — programs to circumvent litigation by offering prompt disclosure, apology and compensation for mistakes as an alternative to malpractice suits are becoming more popular.

 

Stamping Out Rudeness in the Name of Patient Safety

HealthLeaders Media: When healthcare teams are exposed to rudeness, clinical outcomes and teamwork suffer. Vanderbilt University Medical Center has developed a process for resolving disruptive behavior among clinicians.

 

 

Health Care Business News…

House GOP quietly advances key elements of tort reform

Washington Post: House Republicans are advancing a series of bills that would make changes to the civil justice system long sought by doctors and U.S. corporations, including a cap on some medical malpractice awards and new roadblocks for classes of people seeking to sue jointly to address harm.

 

New Guideline Will Allow First-Year Doctors to Work 24-Hour Shifts

First-year doctors in training will now be permitted to work shifts lasting as long as 24 hours, eight hours longer than the current limit, according to a professional organization that sets work rules for graduates from medical schools in the United States. Read more from The New York Times.

 

Higher physician spending not associated with lower admission rates

Healthcare DIVE: Higher physician spending among hospitalists and general internists was not associated with lower 30-day mortality rates or readmissions, a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine found.

 

Law now requires hospitals to tell Medicare patients they are getting ‘observation’ care

Philadelphia Inquirer: Unless their care falls under a new Medicare bundled-payment category, observation patients pay a share of the cost of each test, treatment or other services.

 

What Hospitals Waste

Philadelphia Inquirer: Researchers at the University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, for instance, recently estimated that in a single year the hospital wasted $2.9 million in neurosurgery supplies alone.

 

How 4 organizations are shaking up physician compensation

The Advisory Board: Beginning next year, primary care physicians of Henry Ford Medical Group in Detroit will have a higher percentage of their compensation tied to how many patients choose them as their doctor.

 

What nearly 700 health care leaders predict for big data’s future

The Advisory Board: When asked what the top three data sources would be in five years’ time:

  • 82 percent of respondents said clinical data would be the most useful type;
  • 58 percent said cost data;
  • 40 percent said patient-generated data;
  • 40 percent said genomic data

 

CMS to launch national campaign to promote coordinated-care program

Modern Healthcare: Doctors may be unknowingly leaving hundreds of millions in federal funding on the table that would compensate them to better care for the sickest Medicare beneficiaries, and the CMS is launching a national campaign Wednesday to encourage physicians to take advantage of the funds.

 

AAMC increases projection of physician shortage up to 100K

Healthcare DIVE: The Association of American Medical Colleges’ (AAMC) new estimates of the country’s growing physician shortage shows it will range from 34,600 to 88,000 doctors by 2025 and from 40,800 to 104,900 by 2030.

 

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